Life: Can today’s parents take out 34 minutes daily to spend with their child?

Published on Author Anshul AgarwalLeave a comment

“I lived in Iraq for five years while my husband worked at the Indian embassy. We had to be secretive there, dress properly, can’t utter the name of who can’t be named. And then I got pregnant. So I moved back to India. I was a teacher in Bangalore for 34 years. And then when my daughter had a baby, I left my teaching job and moved here (Hyderabad) to help her. Now I do tuitions and everything from preparing breakfast in the morning to putting my granddaughter to bed in the night. Her parents are so busy, they work till one or two in the night. They don’t have time for her. They don’t even have time for themselves. I enjoy my life with the child, but I fear the impact of this non-relaxing lifestyle of parents on the child. I could left my job of 34 years for their child, but they cannot take out 34 minutes daily for their child.”

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Psychology

The lady raises two very pertinent questions:

Can today’s parents take out 34 minutes daily to spend with their child?

Does the non-relaxing lifestyle of parents affect their child?

We live in a constant state of hurrying. We run through our days hurrying on bath, breakfast, traffic, picking kids from schools, putting them to bed, finishing piled up office work. We believe this is our duty and if we took time out for ourselves or our family, we instantly feel guilt of not doing justice to our duty. We want to do our best in office, we want to do our best at home and we want to provide the best for our kids. But coming to think of it, we outsource most of the things that lie at a lower level in our priority list. We can’t outsource our job, but we outsource housekeeping, cooking and child care to a great chunk. Yet, we can’t seem to relax. With much of the daily activities outsourced, we still can’t seem to make time out for the things that matter most to us- a book, a passion, a hobby, or spending time with the people we care for. We just keep going deep in the mirth, not even pausing to think if we are doing the right thing.

I’ve mentioned it many times earlier, I’ll mention it again- don’t let go of your freedom for the organization you work for. (You can read more here). Organizations only do what they are meant to: they use you to the maximum extent possible, and then get rid of you as cheaply as possible. You can work at an organization and look at it as your source of income while growing in your profession, or you can look at it as all-in-all of your life, becoming a slave to it. You can choose to always stare at your laptop, or you can close it as soon as the office timings are over, and stare at the other pieces of beauty that life has to offer. Like your child, who won’t always be a child. But chances that your organization will be there for a while, no matter you work at it or not. You can let go of all the relaxation by constantly occupying your mind with the job-related matters, or you can make a habit to relax daily after office by freeing your mind of job-related matters. The choice is up to you.

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Psychology

Children learn from you. Initially they imitate you, then you become their role models. They do as you do and chances are that they grow up to be like you, making your lifestyle choices theirs. Non-relaxing attitude being one. They see you hurrying through life, taking little time for yourself and no time for dear ones, they grow up thinking that’s the way to lead the life. They hurry up through school classes, rarely taking time to relax and enjoy all that life has to offer. They hurry up through college viewing it only as a means to getting a job, without enjoying the crucial years of their life. Moreover, they become impatient with those who can’t seem to hurry up or take their time. They find it tough to spend time with other kids who go with speed lesser than them, because they label them as ‘slow.’

They grow up into individuals who place a lot of emphasis on organizations, and little on themselves and their family. They think that an organization has dominance over them and they can’t held their head high above it. Such people are always subjugated to slavery by spokesperson of the organization, like senior leadership or their managers. They also grow up into individuals whose minds are always occupied with job-related matters, anxious and worrying of reaching deadlines.

So does the non-relaxing lifestyle of parents affect their child?

Hope you know the answer by now.

It absolutely does.

Can today’s parents take out 34 minutes daily to spend with their child?

They can, only if they see it on a top position in their priority list.

Otherwise they can’t.


 

Take a step to make yourself heard

Do you feel your non-relaxing has ever affected your child? Or your parents’ ‘hurrying’ attitude affected you? Comment below to make yourself heard!